There are a lot of traditions and customs around the world. Some of these represent the Jewish culture – a complex heritage based on boundless faith. The Jewish wedding is the most representative ritual, because it highlights the deep connection between the spouses and their marital foundation, based on mutual respect, shared responsibilities and religious duty. The centerpiece of a Jewish ceremony is the kosher law.

1. Kosher style wedding: Timeless Jewish traditions

A Jewish wedding ceremony is based on both religious traditions and cultural customs. This is a happy occasion that celebrates the couple’s union in the presence of family and friends. There are many Jewish wedding traditions and some of them start days, weeks, or even months before the actual ceremony. These pre-wedding events are considered to be an important part of the Jewish culture. 

Kosher style wedding: Timeless Jewish traditions - weddo.agency

Here are some of them:

  • The bachelor and bachelorette party – Kabbalat Panim

Both the groom and the bride will have a party known as “Kabbalat Panim” and, similar to the Western customs, it takes place a week before the wedding. The bride and groom have the status of “king” and “queen” and they have to sit on a throne set in the middle of the crowd. The guests will sing, dance and drink around them, while the mothers of the newlyweds have to break a plate together, as a symbol for the fragility of marriage and how important mutual respect is for a lifetime commitment. 

 

  • The veil tradition – Badeken

Seven days before the wedding, the couple can only see each other if the bride has her face covered with a veil. This tradition is called “Baddeken” and dates back to biblical times, namely the story of Isaac, who covered his wife’s face, Rebecca, as a symbol of the fact that his love for her is beyond the physical aspects. But, in a modern manner, the gesture means that the groom will take care and protect his wife during their marriage. 

Kosher style wedding: Timeless Jewish traditions - The veil tradition - Badeken - weddo.agency

  • The wedding day – Yom Kippur

The wedding day is known as “Yom Kippur” in the Jewish tradition. So, to honor this day properly, the bride and groom will be fasting and pray for their sins to be forgiven in order to start their marriage clean. The ceremony itself takes place under a Chuppah – a floral arrangement made of four pillars, that is placed under the open sky. Moreover, the couple should not wear jewelry during the ceremony, symbolizing the fact that love is more important than material wealth. 

Kosher style wedding: Timeless Jewish traditions - The wedding day - Yom Kippur 1 - weddo.agency

Kosher style wedding: Timeless Jewish traditions - The wedding day - Yom Kippur 2 - weddo.agency

 

  • After the wedding – Sheva Brachot

One week after the wedding, the couple’s relatives and friends throw several parties, in order to continue celebrating the couple. Then, after each kosher meal, the bride and groom are blessed by their guests’ prayers. 

 

  • The Kosher food

The term kosher refers to those types of food that obey Jewish laws. Food that is not kosher is called “treyf”. According to the kosher tradition, it’s forbidden to eat meat from certain animals, and the restriction extends to organs, eggs and milk from that species. In order to be able to eat the meat, the animal must have a split hoof. Allowed for a kosher wedding are: beef, goat, sheep, antelope and deer, while camel, rabbit or pork are prohibited. Also, the Torah admits the consumption of chicken, goose, duck and turkey, but not lobsters, shrimps or mussels. The only marine meat that is allowed are fish with scales and fins. 

 

2. Kosher destination wedding: Dubai, a fairytale wedding destination

Dubai is a very romantic destination for a kosher wedding. You will surely enjoy the spectacular landscape and futuristic architecture, so this destination should not be missed. If you are thinking of a dream wedding in Dubai, the WedDo experts can take on this task and make sure that every detail is impeccable and kosher, of course. Here are some venues you should consider for your kosher wedding:

 

  • Armani Hotel

Located in the tallest building in the world, namely Burj Khalifa, this hotel offers luxury services and its rooms are inspired by the famous fashion house. It hosts the only kosher fine dining restaurant in the UAE, being perfect for a glamorous Jewish wedding.

 

  • Hilton Dubai 

Besides the fact that it’s cheaper than most luxury hotels in the city, Hilton Dubai can be the perfect kosher wedding venue, due to the fact that it hosts the first catering service in the area. This can be the real deal if you want your wedding to be luxurious, not very expensive and, moreover, 100% kosher. 

Kosher style wedding: Timeless Jewish traditions - Hilton Dubai  - weddo.agency

  • Atlantis The Palm 

Maybe the most spectacular place in Dubai, The Palm Jumeirah is the largest artificial island in the world, being composed of Atlantis hotel and a giant amusement park. Chandeliers, torches, oversized aquariums, marble, gold, Murano glass, crystals, precious wood and natural plants – all are part of this impressive place. But, most importantly, it hosts more than 20 restaurants and some of them are kosher. So, if you want your special day to be opulent and magnificent, this is the perfect place for your traditional kosher ceremony!

Kosher style wedding: Timeless Jewish traditions - Atlantis The Palm  - weddo.agency

Dubai has not always been a kosher place, but with the signing of the UAE-Israel treaty, more and more Israeli couples are choosing to get married in luxurious venues in this famous city. And the reasons are countless – from the welcoming and warm people and impeccable services, to the spectacular architecture, Dubai is a little paradise for anyone who crosses its threshold.

 

So, if you want your kosher wedding in Dubai to be one of a kind, do not hesitate to collaborate with our wedding planners, whose experience will help you have an exquisite wedding worthy of Jewish traditions.

 

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